« Why We Should Read Boethius | Main | BLEG: An Impecunious Reader Needs a Copy of Husserl's The Paris Lectures »

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

'There could, however, be an appearing that is wholly non-relational: things just appear, are revealed, manifest themselves, but not to a subject.'

Could you explain this in more detail? This seems important, but I can't quite make sense of it. As I understand it, Heidegger defines three ways phenomena manifest themselves to us - appearance, semblance, and the phenomenon itself. Here are two pertinent passages in the introduction to Being and Time for others who might be interested:

'Phenomenon - the self-showing in itself - means a distinctive way something can be encountered. On the other hand, apppearance means a referential relation in beings themselves such that what does the referring (the making known) can fulfill its possible function only if it shows itself in itself - only if it is a "phenomenon". Both appearance and semblance are themselves grounded in the phenomenon, albeit in different ways.' (Being and Time, "Introduction", 7. A., Basic Writings p.32)

'Appearance, as the appearance "of something", thus precisely does not mean that something shows itself; rather, it means that something makes itself known which does not show itself. It makes itself known through something that does show itself. Appearing is a not showing itself.' (ibid, p. 31)

Does Heidegger not presuppose a subject or something like it who is doing the perceiving of these relationships? How would these concepts make sense if not in relation to a perceiving subject - they seem to be based on distinctions based on our perception? Doesn't the Lichtung presuppose some kind of connection between Dasein and the phenomenon showing itself? But perhaps I am making Dasein into something too much like the typical conception of the perceiving subject.

Even Levinas's 'there is' - though as I understand it, it is the being 'behind' all phenomena - seems to require a subject to perceive it, even if the subject is subsumed by the perception of the nothingness of being in the 'there is'.

I'm no doubt showing my ignorance and faulty memory here!

Hector,

The second quotation makes no sense unless 'semblance' is substituted for 'appearance.'

>>Does Heidegger not presuppose a subject or something like it who is doing the perceiving of these relationships? How would these concepts make sense if not in relation to a perceiving subject - they seem to be based on distinctions based on our perception? <<

One might think so. But I recall my old teacher Maraldo saying that Heidegger undercuts the subject-object dichotomy. I would put it this way: he tries to. Whereas Husserl is decidedly Cartesian in many of his works, Heidegger is Cartesian in none.

'Dasein' is not a name for the transcendental ego. For the later Heidegger, Dasein is the Da of Sein, the There of being, the 'place' where Being opens up a 'space,' a 'clearing' within which beings show themselves. Ortschaft des Seins, usw. As I read Heidegger, appearing is not an appearing-to. Appearing is non-relational. Thus there is nothing subjective about appearing. This allows a sort of aletheiological reduction of ens qua ens to ens qua verum.

You can find something like non-relational appearing in Sartre, Butchvarov, and Butchvarov and analytical proponents of 'externalism.'

Hector,

Thanks for mentioning Levinas. His prose is typically French & squishy but he has an interesting critique of Heidegger. I should post something about it.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name and email address are required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

My Photo
Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 10/2008

Categories

Categories

October 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Blog powered by Typepad